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By Charlotte Irwin

 

The photographer has spent the past decade charting the ways in which humans interact with a fast-changing natural world

 

This inquisitive creature, frozen in the drab corridors of local government, is one of the subjects of photographer Lucas Foglia, who has spent the past decade charting the ways in which humans interact with a fast-changing natural world.

 

Foglia’s own interest in our dysfunctional relationship with nature began in the 1980s, when he was growing up on a farm 30 miles from New York. “Growing our food and bartering, my family felt shielded from the strip malls and suburbs around us,” he says.

 

The farm was badly affected when Hurricane Sandy hit in 2012. Foglia’s project has since evolved from studies of the wilderness to portraits of climate-change scientists trying to monitor and protect it.

 

‘Human Nature’ is at Fredericks & Freiser, New York, until January 13